Tag Archives: figs

david lebovitz’s roasted figs

6 Nov

Somewhere between breakfast and dessert lies figs.

One of my favorite food memories is devouring a hot slice of baguette dripping with melted gorgonzola, topped with plump fresh figs and a liberal drizzle of honey. Only after the dinner guests had licked the cutting board clean did the cook inform us he had picked the figs from the sketchy tree in the backyard of his apartment in the Mission.

I f-ing hate “urban foraging.”

Now these beautiful figs, I picked right off the tree at my friend’s vineyard (thanks, Monsons!). As we squished through the muddy orchard rows, I greedily yanked at these black turgid teardrops.

Overwhelmed with my sack of 30 or so gorgeously ripe figs, I decided to snack on a few au naturale, but roast the rest using David Lebovitz’s recipe to savor over the week. He says you’re supposed to spoon these babies over yogurt or ice cream, but it’s really tough not to just pop them like candy.

roasted figs
it’s breakfast, lunch and dinner

1 pound fresh figs, sliced in half pole-to-pole
4-6 branches fresh thyme (I used a sprinkling of dried)
2 tablespoons red wine (I used left over pinot)
1 tablespoon brown sugar
2 tablespoons honey
three 1-inch strips of fresh lemon zest

Use a baking dish that will allow you to bake the figs in a single layer. Preheat the oven to 400ºF (200ºC). Toss the figs in a large baking dish with the thyme, red wine, brown sugar, honey, and lemon zest. Turn the figs so that they are all cut side down in the baking dish, in a single layer.

Cover the baking dish snugly with foil and bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the figs are softened and cooked through. When done, remove the baking dish from oven and let the figs cool completely. Roasted figs can be stored in the refrigerator for up to one week. 6-8 servings.

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(effing delish) fig tart

27 Sep

The dumbest thing you can do on a hot day is bake, but a crate of ripe figs and a birthday celebration convinced me otherwise. No regrets — I am conceitedly in love with the masterpiece of my sweaty labor.

Figs are so beautiful, even when simply sliced into quarters. Their gooey insides are translucent shades of pink and white like miniature watermelons.

For this freeform tart, I began with an easy food processor dough. With the canvas rolled out, I then sprinkled a bed of cinnamon sugar and began placing figs in a startburst pattern starting from the center.

It’s a bit like erecting a tepee at the start — you have to balance three slices to stand up straight, but then it’s easy to lay on concentric circles of slices thereafter. The result: fig tart, fruit art (FART?).

Here it is fully-baked after a liberal dusting of cinnamon sugar and the crust having been folded over and egg-washed. As usual, I had some leaking issues because I rolled the dough greedily thin (I was trying to maximize surface area)! Not to worry, it was still effing delish — lightly sweet and caramelized as only fresh figs can taste. We enjoyed it with a rich, port-like dessert Cab from Big Dog Vineyards.

Fig Tart
who needs brains when you have this much beauty?

* 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon superfine sugar
* 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
* 12-15 fresh figs (depends on size)
* 10 ounces food processor tart dough
* egg wash

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Combine the sugar and cinnamon. Remove stems from the figs and cut vertically into quarters. Roll dough on a lightly floured surface into an 11-inch freeform circle. Transfer the dough to a baking sheet and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon of the cinnamon sugar.

Starting in the center, cover dough with overlapping circles of fig, leaving a 1 1/2-inch border on the outside. Sprinkle with remaining cinnamon sugar mixture.

Raise dough border to enclose the sides of the tart, letting it drape gently over the fruit. Press down on the dough at the baking sheet, snugly securing the sides and bottom; be careful not the mash the fruit. Gently pinch the soft pleats that form from the draping. Brush with egg wash and sprinkle with sanding sugar, if desired.

Bake for 20-25 minutes, until the crust is golden and the figs are softly and lightly caramelized. Cool for 10+ minutes before serving. Serves 6-8.

harvest moon picnic

23 Sep

Harvest Moon over the Golden Gate - taken with Pro HDR app for iPhone

Yesterday marked the official start of Autumn and unlike the previous 19 years, a full moon coincided on the exact date — what is referred to as a harvest moon. The moon rises due east, while the sun sets due west, creating an bright sky lit by both the setting sun and reflective orange moon.

Perched atop the Marin Headlands, we spread out a blanket, popped the bubbly and waited for the celestial show to begin. Inspired by the earthly occasion, I assembled a few harvest-themed snacks.

Baby Heirloom Tomato Caprese Salad

Smoked Salmon on Rye with Lemon Creme Fraiche and Arugula

Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto

Fig season is in full swing, and I procured a large crate of plump juicy gems. While working at Parties That Cook, I learned to oven-roast figs stuffed with tangy gorgonzola and swathed in smoky prosciutto. It’s a recipe that never fails to impress — be it a harvest moon picnic or cocktail party.

Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto with Melted Gorgonzola Centers
a sumptuous small plate, if i ever did meet one

* 24 ripe Black Mission figs
* 3 Tablespoons butter, melted
* 12 slices prosciutto
* 3 ounces Dolce Latte Gorgonzola, (can substitute Cambozola)
* 1/2 bunch thyme

Preheat oven to prepare for broiling.

Cut off the stem of each fig. To make a pocket for the cheese, slice down through the stem of each fig about a half an inch then rotate it and slice down again, creating an X as you view it from the top. Cut each piece of prosciutto in half length-wise. Wrap each fig in prosciutto around the circumference of the fig leaving the stem end of the fig exposed. Brush the fig wrapped in prosciutto with butter. Stuff each pocket in the fig (where you made the slice previously) with Gorgonzola.

Broil the figs for about 5-10 minutes, until the Gorgonzola is melted and the figs are plump.

Garnish each “fig in a blanket” with the tip of a sprig of thyme. Serve immediately while still warm.
Makes 24

Harvest moon: Nightfall over San Francisco - Click to enlarge